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USCIS Announces Revisions in the Employment Authorization Document (EAD)

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has proclaimed to have revised the Employment Authorization Document (EAD) or Form I-766. In order to add a machine-readable zone on the back of the card, the EAD cards have been revised.

Generally, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services issues the Employment Authorization Document, which is also referred to as the U.S. work permit visa. The visa authorizes the holder to work in the United States lawfully. The Form I-766 has to be filed by a foreign national who stays in the U.S. temporarily and wishes to acquire an EAD.AD.

On the basis of the foreign national’s immigration situation, the EAD cards are issued for a specific period of time. Unless the employer has any citizenship requirements, the foreign national with an EAD card can work anywhere in the United States. If the immigrant holds an EAD card, the employer is not even required to file a non-immigrant worker petition.

Currently, the USCIS issues EAD cards under two categories, namely the Renewal EADs and the Replacement EADs. The renewal EAD can be applied for not more than 120 days before the current EAD expires. When lost, stolen, or damaged, individuals can apply for their replacement EAD cards. EAD cards can also be replaced if they contain incorrect information or misspelled name.

In view of deterring immigration fraud, the EAD cards have been revised by the USCIS. The revised EAD cards are being issued by the USCIS from May 11, 2010. The machine-readable zone that has been added newly is in accordance with the International Civil Aviation Organization standards.

The previous version had a two-dimensional bar code, which has now been removed. Additionally, the USCIS has shifted the informational text box just below the magnetic stripe on the card and has retained all the security features that the previous version had.

The revision of the EAD cards has resulted from the collaboration of the USCIS with the U.S. Immigration and Custom Enforcement and the Customs and Border Protection.